Geraint tells us more about what resources are available for physiotherapists regarding primary bone cancers and bone tumours and what difference he thinks the Bone Cancer Awareness Initiative will make to early diagnosis.

Please can you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do for a profession?

Since starting my role as a physiotherapist at Robert Jones Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital 5 years ago, my role has changed considerably. I first started working mainly with post-operative patients on an inpatient ward as well as running a physiotherapy rehab programme. My job role has since changed and I am now a Specialist Practitioner, which is the equivalent to a Clinical Nurse Specialist. I run a weekly physiotherapy led surveillance clinics and am responsible for a wider range of patients – from those who have a history of a benign bone tumour to those who have been diagnosed with a malignant primary bone cancer.

How aware do you think physiotherapists are of the signs and symptoms of primary bone cancer?

There is big awareness and understanding of red flag symptoms to look out for as a physiotherapist, but it is about having the scope of practice to piece these symptoms together and consider a possible primary bone cancer diagnosis.

Have you received any formal training on the symptoms of primary bone cancer?

I did not receive any formal training on primary bone cancers until coming to work at RJAH. I have been a physiotherapist for 15 years now.

What difference do you think the Bone Cancer Awareness Initiative will make to your role and earlier diagnosis?

It is all about raising the profile and awareness of these rare bone cancers so that quicker referrals can take place, allowing patients to receive quicker diagnosis and treatment.

To find out more about the Bone Cancer Awareness Initiative click below.

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